All places in the category "Worship"

Business Development Centre, formerly Great Garden Street Synagogue and Morris Lederman House

Former foundry to rear converted to be a synagogue in 1896, front range Federation of Synagogues offices of 1972-4, all converted in 1999

part of Calcutta House

1962 former tea warehouse, site of St Paul's German Reformed Church, later part of Calcutta House, London Metropolitan University

East London Mosque

Mosque, 1982-5

East One Building, 20-22 Commercial Street

1927-8 former factory building, with later top floor, converted to offices 2002-3, site of St Jude's church

Whitechapel Mission

Methodist Mission built to designs by Lee Reading & Associates, 1969-71, with chapel to north, hostel to south

Zoar Chapel

Free Presbyterian chapel built c.1921 with red brick dressings.

Sushino En (formerly St Mary's House)

1894-5, Clergy House for St Mary Matfelon Whitechapel, converted to post office and then to restaurant

19 White Church Lane

1898-9 as a house, factory and office (with 9 Manningtree Street)

St Paul's School

1869-70, primary school, on the site of the Danish–Norwegian Churh of 1694–6

Duru House

1970-3 clothing warehouse on the site of the Church of St Augustine, built 1879

Vallance Gardens, Vallance Road

public garden, formerly Quakers' Burial Ground from 1687 to 1857, landscaped as a recreation ground 1879-80 and again in 2002-3

Church of St Paul

church of 1846-7, founded as a seamen's chapel, converted to a nursery in 2002

Toynbee Hall

1880s Tudoresque settlement house with later additions, streetside building site of St Jude's vicarage

St George’s German Lutheran Church

1763, German Lutheran Church

St Paul's School Mission Room and Infant Nursery (later used as Church House)

1874, school and mission hall, adapted in 1958 to be Church House, a refuge for prostitutes

John Garnett House, 38 Newark Street

Late 19th century former vicarage with Gothic arched windows, red brick dressings and a plaque to J. R. Green, historian.

East London Central Synagogue

Synagogue built to designs by Lewis Solomon and Son, c.1923.

29-33 White Church Lane

1936-7, gown factory and showroom, demolished 2016

Altab Ali Park, including the site of the parish church of St Mary Matfelon

Former churchyard with medieval origins, renamed in 1994

St Philip's Church Library and the Royal London Museum

Red brick church of 1888–92 designed by Arthur Cawston and converted into a medical library in the 1980s.

101 Greenfield Road

1963–5 garment workshops, on site of former 16-24 Fieldgate Street and 1-2 Greenfield Road

Roman Catholic Church of the English Martyrs

1875-6, designed by Pugin & Pugin

Wellclose Square

square laid out in 1682–3 by Nicholas Barbon and associates, enclosed by railings of 1870

Kensington Apartments, 11 Commercial Street

2013 7- and 12-storey blocks of flats and shop, site of 1854-5 Baptist Chapel and former 21 Commercial St (before 1878 11 Commercial St)

Greater Whitechapel

St Boniface German Church, 47 Adler Street

1959-60, Roman Catholic church

Maryam Centre, East London Mosque, Fieldgate Street

2009-13, women's prayer hall and community centre

189 Whitechapel Road

1900 as a mission hall for the Hebrew Christian Testimony to Israel, William Alfred Pite, architect

187 Whitechapel Road

early 1640s in origin, house with shop

Former Wilcox's New Music Hall and Vine Court synagogue

Music hall of 1869-71 converted to synagogue in 1892 and to clothing factory c.1980, largely rebuilt c.2005

115 New Road and the former New Road Synagogue

shophouse of 1851, refronted in the mid 1980s. The former New Road Synagogue of 1891–2 is to the rear.

Former Fieldgate Street Great Synagogue

1897-9, rebuilt in 1947-60, closed and converted for use by the East London Mosque in 2015-16

Tayyabs, 85-87 Fieldgate Street

1907 as a shophouse with synagogue to rear, now Tayyabs restaurant

London Action Resource Centre, 62 Fieldgate Street

1866–7 mission hall and infants' school, converted for free-school and synagogue use in the 1920s, adapted as a resource centre in 2001–2