40 Dock Street

early 1980s, part of Vodafone distribution centre (formerly known as Turret Business Centre)

Sugar & Tea
Contributed by Bryan Mawer on March 14, 2018

In the early 1830s John Hodgson moved into a new sugarhouse at the bottom end of Dock Street.1 As the biggest danger in the trade was fire, this was built to the fire-proof pattern of brick walls surrounding a cast iron frame and pillars. 9 storeys, 5 bays to front, 6 bays to side, small windows with segmented heads and iron glazing bars, thicker walls for the lower storeys.2 - 3 John Harrison took over c1856 in partnership with Wilson for a short time, and then continued by himself through to the 1870s.1

The building was taken over by the Monastery Bonded Tea Warehouse in 1889.4 A fire in 1972 caused serious damage 5, and the building was eventually demolished in 1980-1.6


  1. Mawer, Sugar Refiners & Sugarbakers: www.mawer.clara.net 

  2. Historic England: https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list- entry/1065212 

  3. Images - Collage: https://collage.cityoflondon.gov.uk/search-results?key =WnsiUCI6eyJrZXl3b3JkcyI6Ik1vbmFzdGVyeSB0ZWEgd2FyZWhvdXNlIiwia2V5d29yZHNNb2RlI joxfX0&WINID=1521059457106 

  4. St George-in-the-East Church: http://www.stgitehistory.org.uk/stpauldockst.html 

  5. Lewis, Frank: Sugar & Essex (Appendix p.130) 

  6. Image by Mrs C Ely at Tower Hamlets Local History Library 

Former sugarhouse (later Monastery Bonded Tea Warehouse) from the southeast in the early 1970s (photograph by Dan Cruickshank)
Contributed by Dan Cruickshank

40 Dock Street in the early 1970s (photograph by Dan Cruickshank)
Contributed by Dan Cruickshank

Former sugarhouse (later Monastery Bonded Tea Warehouse) from the northeast in the early 1970s (photograph by Dan Cruickshank)
Contributed by Dan Cruickshank